List of Plants Poisonous for Cats – The Top 31

So you fancy yourself a bit of a green thumb huh? You’ve got a few plants outside and perhaps even a few indoors to green up your place and provide some nice fresh oxygen right?  I do the same, but little did I know that a huge number of common plants around the house are incredibly dangerous to our feline friends.  Even things that are perfectly fine for humans to eat can be incredibly toxic for your cat if they happen to ingest it.

To ensure your cat is safe you’ll want to do a quick review of any plants you have against this list of plants poisonous for cats.  Many cats won’t bother your plants at all, especially if they’ve got lots of other things to keep them active and busy. That being said, there are plenty of cats that are quite entertained by beating up and chewing on any house plant they come across. Given the potential health issues that can come from your cat eating these plants you should definitely take a look at the list just to make sure you know the signs your cat will exhibit if she has made a meal out of your favorite plant.


So Which Plants Should I Look Out for?

If you’d prefer to scan pictures and read through the names I’ve outlined a pretty comprehensive list below.  These are 31 of the most common houseplants that can be dangerous to your cat if eaten. If you’re wondering why 31, mostly because I originally set out to provide a list of 30 but after the fact discovered that the green parts of a tomato plant can be dangerous. I figured that since tomato plants are so common I had better include it in the list, and thus 31.

Note the list is in alphabetical order, not in order of severity or danger. Any of the below plants can cause serious issues for your cat if they eat enough of it, the quantity that determines enough varies by each specific plant. Do your best to keep an eye on your kitty and make sure they have other good stuff to chew on like cat grass or catnip.

I’ve also included a link from each individual plant over to the ASPCA & Poison Pet Helpline website so you can read up on the plant in more detail if you’d like.

Photo Plant Name Level of Toxicity Top Signs of Ingestion
amaryllis Amaryllis

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal discomfort
Autumn Crocus Autumn Crocus

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to severe
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea (bloody)
Azalea Azalea

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to severe
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Caladium Caladium

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Pawing at face
  • Drooling / Difficulty swallowing
  • Vomiting
Chives Chives

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling / Oral Irritation
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Abdominal pain
Chrysanthemum Chrysanthemum

ASPCA / PPH

Generally Mild
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of Appetite
Cyclamen Cyclamen

ASPCA / PPH

Generally Mild to Moderate
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Seizures
Daffodils Daffodils

ASPCA / PPH

Generally Mild to Moderate
  • Drooling
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Abnormal breathing
Dieffenbachia Dieffenbachia

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Oral pain
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of Appetite
Garlic Garlic

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling / Oral irritation
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Abdominal pain
Holly Holly

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Lip smacking / Drooling
  • Head shaking
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of Appetite
Hyacinth Hyacinth

ASPCA / PPH

 

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Hydrangea Hydrangea

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Iris Iris

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Ivy Ivy

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Hypersalivation
  • Diarrhea
  • Pawing at the mouth
Kalanchoe Kalanchoe

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to severe
  • Drooling
  • Nausea / Vomiting
Lily Lilies

(Tiger, Day, Easter, Star Gazer, Japanese)

ASPCA / PPH

Generally Moderate to severe
  • Lack of Appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Hiding
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Lily Of The Valley Lily of the Valley

ASPCA / PPH

Generally Moderate to severe
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Slowed heart rate
Marijuana Marijuana

ASPCA / PPH

Moderate to severe
  • Lethargy
  • Coma
  • Dilated pupils
Mistletoe Mistletoe

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
Morning Glory Morning Glory

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Incoordination
  • Diarrhea
Oleander Oleander

ASPCA / PPH

Generally moderate to severe
  • Drooling
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
Onion Onion

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Oral irritation
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
Peony Peony

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Philodendron Philodendron

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Oral pain / Pawing at the mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of Appetite
Poinsettia Poinsettia

ASPCA / PPH

Mild
  • Drooling / Licking lips
  • Skin irritation
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Rhododendron Rhododendron

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to severe
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of Appetite
  • Abdominal pain
Sago Palm Sago Palm

ASPCA / PPH

Severe
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of Appetite
Tomato Plant Tomato Plant

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
Tulips Tulips

ASPCA / PPH

Generally mild to moderate
  • Drooling
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
European Yew Yew

ASPCA / PPH

 Generally Moderate to Severe
  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness

 


I’m More of a Video Person

If on the other hand you prefer a video to show you the ropes you can check out this very informative, if a little odd, video from Dr. Steven Hansen at the ASPCA. Dr. Hansen goes through a list of about 17 different plants and the potential issues they might cause your cat. The presentation is a bit funny to watch given the delivery, but it is loaded with great information:

Even if a bit dated, it was a great watch right? I’m sure you learned something new from it, I know I did!


Wrapping things up:

Hopefully the list and the video have been helpful to you and will ensure your cat stays safe and sound in and around your home! While the list above calls out some of the most common household plants that are poisonous to cats there are literally hundreds of other plants that can make your cat sick. Note I’m not trying to fear monger and keep you from growing plants, I have numerous plants in the house with no issues at all. I’m simply encouraging you to check your plants against the list of plants poisonous to cats to keep your furry feline friend safe!

For more comprehensive lists please visit the following links:

    • The ASPCA Poison Database – Here you can search for any plant and see if it is poisonous to cats. The search is kind of clunky and you have to manually scroll through many pages sometimes, but the information is very useful.
    • Pet Poison Help Line – Here you can search for any plant and see if it is poisonous to cats (as well as dogs, horses and bunch of other animals).
    • The Cat Fancier’s Association’s Comprehensive List – Everything is on one page so it is very quick to do a CTRL-F and find your plant of interest, but there’s not much beyond the plant names.

If you’re having problems with your cat eating your house plants inside then check out my article on helping you avoid this potentially hazardous activity. The article is full of proven methods to keep your cats away from plants, and if you can’t keep them away there are some alternatives as well like growing your own cat grass.

If you’re worried your cat has eaten a poisonous plant then get your cat to a veterinarian as quickly as possible and bring the plant along with you for ease of identification.  If it is after hours and you need help immediately then you can try one of the following:

  • Contact the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center at one of these numbers: 1-888-426-4435 (a $65 dollar charge might apply)
  • Call the Pet Poison Help Line at 855-764-7661 (note there is a $59 dollar charge for their help)

Please share any experience you have in keeping your cat from eating plants, poisonous or not. Feel free to leave a comment about it below or email me directly at Craig@StuffCatsWant.com. I’ll be happy to update the article to reflect any additional information!


Please note that StuffCatsWant is providing this information as a service to the public. I am not a veterinarian and nor do I claim to be. Your veterinarian should handle any diagnosis and treatment if your cat has eaten any of the plants above. StuffCatsWant disclaims all warranties and liability related to the veterinary advice and information provided on this site.

StuffCatsWant.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

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13 thoughts on “List of Plants Poisonous for Cats – The Top 31

  • May 30, 2017 at 1:51 am
    Permalink

    Wow! I knew about the dieffenbachia, but not chives! And tulips and peonies!

    Thank you for posting this with the pictures. I wish I had this kind of info when I had 3 cats. They all passed away within a year of each other, and since we had moved to another area. I often wondered if it was something they ate 🙁

    Very good article.

    Reply
    • May 30, 2017 at 2:49 am
      Permalink

      Thanks for stopping in Irma. I was just as floored when I started doing research. I had no idea how many things could get them so sick! I guess we humans have just as many potential things that make us sick too.

      Reply
  • May 30, 2017 at 1:57 am
    Permalink

    Wow! Interesting information. Thanks for this post. Especially the phone numbers to contact in case of emergency. Definitely useful post. Great work!

    Reply
    • May 30, 2017 at 2:50 am
      Permalink

      Hopefully you never have to use them, but it is indeed good to have them handy!

      Reply
  • May 30, 2017 at 10:45 am
    Permalink

    This is fantastic! Thanks Craig for the valuable information. Though I don’t have cats now, I have a lot of friends who owns one and they also have plants at home. I will share this with them as this is very important. Thank you very much Craig =)

    Reply
    • May 30, 2017 at 2:03 pm
      Permalink

      Glad to help. If you have further questions let me know!

      Reply
  • May 30, 2017 at 1:19 pm
    Permalink

    I didn’t know cats were allergic to so many plants. Some of these sound like they casn be serious. Most of these plants seem to be common. Any one with an herb garden should be careful with chives, garlic and onions. It also looks like the holidays could be dangerous with holly and poinsettias. I had no idea. Thanks for the info.

    Reply
    • May 30, 2017 at 2:04 pm
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      Yeah, I never would have known myself until I started digging into it when my cat Beast started chewing on plants at home. There are dangers all around us I guess!

      Reply
  • May 31, 2017 at 6:35 pm
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    HI there,
    Great information in your post. Thanks for your list. I didn’t know that plants can be that dangerous for cats. Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

    Reply
  • May 31, 2017 at 10:19 pm
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    I didn’t know (like probably many of us) that some plants are poisonous to cats. My parents own a cat and thankfully he’s not interested in plants. I consume a lot of garlic due to my weak immune system and I hope that my future pet won’t be interested in that (though why would it since it smells bad lol).

    I’m wondering if in case the cat gets poisoned if we can treat him at home with activated charcoal as it pretty fast acting. They use it on hospital patients so I’m wondering if the same can be done with the cat instead of spending hundreds of dollars at the vet. Of course if it’s necessary to see vet than of course it has to be done.

    Reply
    • June 1, 2017 at 3:45 am
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      That’s a good question Vanessa. I’m honestly not sure of the answer. I assume it would depend on which specific plant was eaten and the severity of that plant for cats. I think you’d be best off talking to a licensed vet to answer that question :0.

      Craig

      Reply
  • June 3, 2017 at 11:45 pm
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    Hey Craig, this really opened my eyes to a few things. I had no idea that chrysanthemums and peonies were poisonous to cats! I’m not the biggest cat lover but we do have a lot of roamers in my neighbourhood–some of which belong to my neighbours. It looks like my wife and I will have to change our planting plans…but is there anything that we could use to keep them away from the flowerbeds and potted plants maybe?

    Reply
    • June 3, 2017 at 11:54 pm
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      Hey Joshua, that’s very considerate of you to look out for the neighborhood roamers!. Most outdoor cats won’t just randomly start bothering your plants if they’ve been there for quite some time, so you shouldn’t be immediately worried.

      That being said there are a few things you can do. Some of the recommendations in my article on how to deter indoor cats will work for outdoor cats:
      https://stuffcatswant.com/how-to-keep-cats-from-eating-house-plants

      The most likely are probably to mix something into the soil like the lion dung or to plant ‘buffer plants.’ You could also give the lemon peels or orange peels in the soil a shot as well.

      They do also make some interesting products like this thing below. It basically emits noises at frequencies humans don’t hear but animals do and it keeps them away. I’ll freely admit I’ve never used one myself but the reviews are quite positive!
      http://amzn.to/2rEBavb

      Reply

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